Equating pro-abortion arguments with pro-slavery arguments: “I don’t personally agree with it, but who am I to tell someone else how to live?”

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Just came across an article that articulates specific reasons why common pro-choice arguments are essentially the same as pro-slavery arguments.

And if any of my friends identify as pro-choice, don’t go hating on me for including this piece that is more than a little harsh/ spiteful/ condescending in tone.  Mark Twain, as you may recall, was a staunch opponent of slavery, and he was also a bitter pessimist against any and all sympathizers, whether or not they actually practiced the institution themselves.  You could choose to think of this writer in a similar way if you’d like.  Here is the article in full:

Arguments commonly made in support of slavery and abortion:

Appeal to privacy: “Well, I don’t personally endorse or condone slavery, but who am I to tell someone what to do with their own property?”
Appeal to privacy: “Well, I personally object to abortion, but who am I to tell someone what to do with their own body?”

Appeal to the superseding right: “My property rights come before the rights of a slave.”
Appeal to the superseding right: “My reproductive rights come before the rights of a fetus.”

Appeal to popular sovereignty: “States can decide for themselves if they want slavery. If a state doesn’t like slavery, they don’t have to have it.”
Appeal to personal sovereignty: “Don’t like abortion? Don’t have one.”

Appeal to inevitability: “Slavery has been around for thousands of years, it’s never going to go away. We might as well have a safe and legal system in place for it.”
Appeal to inevitability: “Abortion has been around forever, it’s never going to go away. We might as well have a safe and legal system for it.”

Appeal to faux-science: “Slaves aren’t really people. They aren’t like us. Look at them — they’re physically different, therefore we are human and they are not. They don’t have the same rights as white people.”
Appeal to faux-science: “Unborn babies aren’t really people: they’re fetuses. Look at them — they’re physically undeveloped. Therefore, we are fully human and they are not. They don’t have the same rights as born people.”

Appeal to economic concerns: “The economy relies on slavery. It would be a financial disaster if it ever came to an end.”
Appeal to economic concerns: “The tax base is strained already, most of these babies would end up on welfare. It would be a financial disaster if abortion came to an end.”

Appeal to the courts: “Slavery was vindicated by the Supreme Court in Dredd Scott. It’s already been decided, there’s no point in arguing it. Nine men in robes said that blacks are property, and so that settles it.”
Appeal to the courts: “Abortion was vindicated by the Supreme Court in Roe v Wade. It’s already been decided, there’s no point in arguing. Nine people in robes said that fetuses aren’t people, and so that settles it.”

Appeal to faux-compassion: “Slavery is in the best interest of Africans. They can’t function in the real world, they need to be protected and guided by the white man.”
Appeal to faux-compassion: “Abortion is merciful. These babies are unwanted. They would have a miserable life. Better to help them avoid it all together.”

Appeal to the Bible: “Slavery isn’t condemned in the Bible. If it’s wrong, Jesus would have specifically said so, but He didn’t.”
Appeal to the Bible: “Abortion isn’t condemned in the Bible. If it’s wrong, Jesus would have specifically said so, but He didn’t.”

 

ddd

I just love me a rousing expression of freedom of speech.

In the words of my friend Crystal, “Stir the pot, why not?”

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